Sabbath Around the World

The Lord has frequently declared that we are to keep the Sabbath Day holy. Earlier this month we explored BYU nursing professors balance work responsibilities with this commandment while working on Sundays. Now we highlight some of the various ways that students in the clinical practicum for the Public and Global Health Nursing courses sanctify the Lord’s Day while serving others in their diverse locales.

Veterans

After church services, the Veteran group visits Arlington Cemetery where many of the United States’ war veterans are interred. The group participates in the Changing of the Guard and a wreath ceremony while touring the grounds. Students present on veterans that they have researched.

“It’s a spiritual feast every year to be in such a sacred place, where all who are there have given the ultimate sacrifice,” says teaching professor Dr. Kent Blad, who heads the group. “’Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends’ (John 15:13). It’s my favorite day of every year.”

Vets

Samoa

In Samoa, students tend to volunteer with the local wards.

“We divided the students up and some helped in the nursery, some substituted primary and taught about the love of God for all his children, and some worked with the young women-all in an English speaking ward,” writes assistant teaching professor Gaye Ray of one of her trips to Samoa. “Another Sunday we attended a Samoan-speaking ward and participated in the fast and testimony meeting.” Students also met a 92-year-old convert and visited the Samoan temple.

“In all sites we use the day for personal study, reflection on lessons learned about humility and what it means to be culturally humble, gospel truths, along with discussions surrounding our observations on ‘locally appropriate’ cultural adaptations of church programs and how they bless the lives of the saints in the country,” Ray says.

Neil

Finland and the Czech Republic

Associate teaching professor Dr. Leslie Miles explains that students visit the small Savonlinna branch in Finland, give talks, and present musical numbers. She describes it as the “highlight of the year for the members.” Afterwards, the students take flowers to the local cemetery, tour houses, walk in the forests, and talk with the missionaries.

In the Czech Republic, students visit other churches and learn about various religions.

Ecuador

Ghana

The Lord’s work doesn’t stop on the Lord’s day. Students who travel to Ghana will do blood pressure and blood glucose checks for local ward members on Sunday.

“A favorite activity is to have a fireside with the Abu family and hear first-hand about the conversion story of African pioneer members,” says associate teaching professor Karen de la Cruz, who heads the Ghana trip. “We have also had the sweet opportunity to have a dinner and testimony activity with the missionary couple that serve in the Abomosu sub-district.”

Eat

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