Four Steps to Food Safety

 

Family enjoying meal outdoors
Practicing Proper Food Safety Techniques Can Help Keep You Family Safe               (Image Courtesy of CDC)

An undercooked steak could be the difference between a good night’s sleep and a trip to the ER. Every year 48 million Americans suffer from one of the most preventable diseases on the planet—food poisoning. As part of National Food Safety Education Month, here are four easy tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to prevent food poisoning.

4%20steps to food safety - clean, separate, cook, chill
(Image Courtesy of CDC)

     1. CleanAccording to the National Health Service (NHS), a single flu virus can survive on your kitchen countertop for up to 24 hours. Use antibacterial soaps and cleaning supplies to rid your kitchen of any germs that may linger on your hands, utensils, or cutting boards. The CDC also recommends rinsing fresh fruits and vegetables under running water to clean off any dirt or pesticides before consumption.

(Check out this USDA Food Safety “Clean” Video for more details)

 

      2. Separate

Have you ever wondered why you need a separate bag for raw meats at the grocery store? This is to prevent cross-contamination—the spread of bacteria from one source to another, particularly from raw meat to other foods. Prevent cross-contamination by keeping raw meats, poultry, seafood, and eggs separate from produce and ready-to-eat foods. Also, be sure to sanitize any surfaces or utensils that touch raw meat or meat juices before using them elsewhere.

Make Sure You Separate Food to Prevent Cross-Contamination                  (Image Courtesy of CDC)

(Check out this USDA Food Safety “Separate” Video for more Details)

 

     3. Cook

How do you know if your steak is cooked well enough? Just because it looks done does not necessarily mean it’s bacteria-free. Checking your food’s internal temperature with a food thermometer is a key way to make sure it is fully cooked.

The CDC recommends the following internal temperatures for different dishes:

  • 145˚F: Internal Temperature for whole beef, lamb, fin fish, fresh pork and ham.
  • 160˚F: Internal Temperature for ground beef, pork, and lamb, and any egg dishes
  • 165˚F: Internal Temperature for all poultry (including ground chicken and turkey), stuffing, leftovers, and casseroles

(Check out this USDA Food Safety “Cook” Video for more Details)

 

       4. Chill

Did you know that germs can grow on some foods within two hours if they are not properly refrigerated? The CDC recommends keeping your refrigerator below 40˚F to slow bacterial growth. Check food labels and ensure that perishable food items are properly refrigerated. Also, be sure to thaw frozen meats properly using a microwave or cold water.

Grill Safety Chill Foods Sqaure image

(Check out this USDA Food Safety “Chill” Video for more Details)

 

 

For additional information, see the links below:

https://www.cdc.gov/features/befoodsafe/index.html

http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/how-long-do-bacteria-and-viruses-live-outside-the-body.aspx

https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/education-month.html

 

 

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